Made from scratch: Gorgeous lemon sugar handscrub for gardeners

limeI can’t tell you how excited I am by this discovery.  Cheap, effective and smells delicious!

The siren call of Spring and the warmer weather have lured me out into the garden. I’m spending many happy hours out there, redesigning on the hoof and trying out different kinds of garden bed construction (more on that later).  It’s bliss for most of me, but not my hands which have become scratchy and rough with ingrained dirt in skin and nail.  I don’t know about you, but I always forget my gloves, and on the odd occasion I do remember them, they don’t seem to stay on for very long!

The results?  The garden looks pretty but my hands look awful.  Worse, the really rough skin catches constantly and most unpleasantly on delicate and synthetic fabrics such as microfibre cleaning cloths and lingerie (I know, first world problems right, but still).

So it was with great pleasure that I discovered this super quick, super easy and very economical handscrub.  Major bonus?  It works to slough off dry skin and leave your hands smooth and supple and your nails looking great. Even better, you can make this with ingredients you probably already have to hand.

handscrubGardener’s lemon handscrub

  1. Put a cup of sugar into any old jar with a lid, choose a pretty jar if you have one
  2. Pour on sufficient olive oil to moisten the sugar
  3. Mix well, add more olive oil to your preference (I like it slightly on the wet side)
  4. Add a few drops of your favourite essential oil.  I’m a lemonophile so I go for lemon.  Lavender would also be lovely
  5. Keep it by your sink and next time you come in from the garden scoop a generous spoonful, rub between your soil encrusted hands and simply rinse off with warm water
  6. Enjoy your newly smooth and supple paws!

To my delight, this handscrub works every bit as well as the L’Occitane salt version (Lordy that’s pricy!) which my beloved once kindly bought for me.  So if you’re working out where to invest your hard earned cash I’d make this scrub and put the money towards a good shea butter hand moisturiser.  And, maybe come to think of it, I may just need one of these scrubs in the shower for exfoliation as well…

Made from scratch: everyday pleasures

Homemade._SX260_Every now and again I get very excited by a new recipe.  But it’s never one of those Cuisine Magazine extravaganzas with 27 ingredients.  Instead, the recipes which float my boat are those which show how to make something I’d ordinarily be obliged to buy such as crackers, pasta, biscuits, jam and …marshmallows you know, just the essentials.

With this approach to cooking, the pleasure comes from a feeling of self sufficiency, a smidgen of frugality and a soupcon of sticking it to ‘big food’.  In going back to the way our grandmothers used to cook, there’s something of the pioneering spirit about it. If you have relied on preprepared or processed foods (and let’s face it there can’t be too many families with two parents working outside the home who haven’t) is can feel empowering to get back to basics and demystify food. For me it’s satisfying to circumvent the commercial powers that be, and I enjoy knowing what goes in to what we eat.  Some say growing your own food is a political act.  I’d say cooking it is too.

My favourite recipes are based around pantry staples, with the considerable benefit that you don’t need to get dressed to make them (no special trip out for pomegranate molasses!). Generally staples can be bought in bulk, meaning that otherwise pricy Lavosh crackers for example cost virtually nothing to make, and you can make a lot at once.

If a recipe is to make it on to the regular rota of things made in my kitchen they also need to be more delicious than ‘shop bought’. Putting some spectacular failures aside for a moment, this is often shockingly easy.  A wise gardening rule is only to grow what you really like to eat.  This rule applies to cooking and baking as well.  If the kids eat them, and they store or freeze well, consider me sold.

There are certain reliable guides I have found, and I highly recommend them.

Everyday-109x150Sophie Gray of Destitute Gourmet is my go-to for all basic household cooking.  My top five most cooked items, including birthday cakes and everyday baking come from her stable.  These are the cookbooks I wished to replace first after an unfortunate incident with a rogue watermelon.

Sophie is remarkable for her down to earth approach, her sense of humour and her understanding of the pressures involved in feeding a family well and healthily on a budget.

Homemade._SX260_

One indicator of long term value in a cookbook for me is the number of times I have had it out from the library before I buy it.  I just couldn’t let this one go.   Homemade is a gorgeous book by Yvette Van Boven, a Dutch chef with a lot of heart and a fearless ‘why not’ attitude to making hearty, delicious satisfying food, including the mucho moreish Lavosh crackers mentioned above.

 

Homemade pantry TopRight,1,0_SH20_

3. Another reliable indicator is the number of post it notes you stick into a book as you read through it for the first time.  This book, Homemade pantry – 101 foods you can stop buying and start making  looked like a little yellow 3M sponsored hedgehog by the time I had finished with it.  In fact, I’m still not finished with it.

Do you have a go-to cookbook for everyday or do you rely on friends and family for recipes? And what do you find you tend to make over and over again?